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Mar 22, 2008

Permanent residency for aliens courtesy of the CNMI gov't? Really now?

The Fitial administration apparently wants to grant its own version of "permanent residency" to longtime nonresident workers in the CNMI. But this early, the idea is getting lukewarm response; if not outright rejection.

Early this afternoon, Deanne Siemer, who calls herself a volunteer counsel for the governor, along with Maya Kara, met with representatives of longtime nonresident workers, for a "consultation meeting" regarding the granting of permanent residency to eligible alien workers.

It was not supposed to be a secret meeting, but nobody from the media was invited (or maybe they'd have an interview with the key players later), and only a few were advised of the gathering beforehand.

There were about 30 present in the meeting, including Atty. Steve Woodruff, Greg Cruz, and alien workers.

What makes the CNMI government's idea of granting permanent immigration status to longtime guest workers better than what the federal government would have offered?

Among the questions in people's mind: What exactly would a CNMI government-granted permanent residence status entail? What are the benefits to alien workers? To residents? Why only now? Is it only for show? To appease the federal government, now that it is federalizing CNMI immigration? What are the eligibility requirements? Whose idea is this? Why call it permanent residency? Why not long-term alien residency? How could it be done -- through plebiscite?

The next 'consultation meeting' has been tentatively set for April 2, so be ready with your questions.

141 comments:

Marianas Pride said...

Wow, desperate times call for desperate measures. Why does this not surprise me? I think nothing surprises me these days.

HBM said...

Interesting post, Weird Elle. Tina Sablan is also drafting a bill that would give guest workers more secure status under CNMI law. Tina's integrity and motives are beyond reproach. If there are significant differences between what Tina ultimately supports and what Deanne Siemer proposes, the latter will face a credibility gap that will be very hard to bridge. None of this is relevant to the federalization debate in Washington, however.

Marianas Pride said...

I guess the "thousands" that attended the anti-fed rally didn't really do much. Oh well, time to switch gears and promise the world. Surely we can believe this administration. After all, we were promised better times. Judging by the millions of tourists and the tons of investors pouring in, and the stable and inexpensive electricity we all enjoy, it truly is better times! Yes, why not believe our volunteer Deane Seimer? I mean, she is working for free right? Keep up the great work Deane and Howard! You should be christened and honored as true local Saints!

Marianas Pride said...

Can we please declare a national holiday in honor of our new local Saints, Howard Willens and Deane Seimer? They are crusaders for justice. God bless you, you kind loving couple! to know that this administration never paid for any of your hotel lodging or travel expenses makes me realize just how noble you really are. God bless!!

Marianas Pride said...

"Volunteers".... Apparently we need to revisit what a volunteer really means.

Anonymous said...

Shame on you for your sarcastic attacks on Deanne Seimer. She fills a void that was left in this world when Mother Theresa passed away.

Marianas Pride said...

What sarcasm? I believe Mother Theresa channels her work through Deane Seimer. Before I sleep, I pray to Deane for guidance. Is that okay?

glend558 said...

I smell a scam here, or as I often refer to 'bullshit' There can be absolutely no good come out of this and I don't even know what it is. Anytime the government seems to offer something other then for themselves... Look for a knife in the back somewhere.

Anonymous said...

Deane defends the poor, the oppressed, the less fortunate... I heart deane!

Anonymous said...

Ref, please create a survey and ask your readers if they would trust Tina Sablan or Deanne Siemer with granting permanent residency to guest workers? I will bet my collection of stamps that people will choose Tina. She does what is best for all people. Deanne does what Uncle Ben tells her.

Anonymous said...

Some people who asked to attend were told only two per nationality.

You left out the Chamber President who was there too. Could this be a ploy to defeat federalization? Tina's bill would fill the year long void from when the federalization bill passes until when it is enacted a year later.

The fact that it is called permanent residency is incorrect. A territory cannot offer such status.


The next meeting is American Memorial Park 1:00, April 2. Hope the press shows up!

At the meeting they said the CNMI government would charge 9,000 guest workers $500 to stay in the CNMI for 5 years. That is $4,500,00.00. They would be free to work for anyone, even multiple employers As long as they obey laws cannot be deported. Their families could stay (for a fee, no doubt.) Can we trust these people? What they pass they can repeal.

Volunteer? Is Kara one too? Who do they represent in the legislature? Why didn't the person who wrote the bill introduce it? A constitutional amendment? By the time this could happen the federalization bill will have passed.

The Saipan Blogger アンジェロ・ビラゴメズ said...

Doesn't an H visa cost $2000 and is only good for 3 years?

Anonymous said...

Actually, for employers with 25 or fewer workers, the H1-B visa can be as little as $1520, and it's good for up to six years. And after five, the holder can apply to change their status to LPR (Green Card).

Anonymous said...

Once they use the workers to stop the take over bill, won't they take their permanent resident awauy?

Anonymous said...

Here's what Siemer is up to:

Step One: Suggest that they are willing to offer the guest workers and their families a more secure status in the CNMI.

Step Two: Point out that the federalization bill no longer provides guest workers with a guarantee of improved status. (Of course, she and the rest of this administration are the ones that worked so hard to get the improved status provision out of the bill.)

Step Three: Point out that if the federalization bill passes, any grant of improved status by the CNMI will eventually be moot, with no guarantee of improved status from the federal government in return.

Step Four: Get the guest workers to lobby against federalization.

Step Five: Once the guest workers have served their purpose, repeal their improved status under CNMI law (just as the CNMI has repealed labor reforms in the past).

Remember how the CNMI administration complained that if you give guest workers the right to stay here, it would overwhelm the island ("it will kill us!")? And now they want to even add to that by letting guest workers bring their families as well? Are they now admitting that their arguments then were just bogus politics? Or are they trying to use the guest workers now to advance their agenda? The answer is obvious.

the devil and mrs devil said...

It is nice to know the devil's work is being done by Deanne. Did you know she was pro-federalization before? Ask her and see if she lies. Wait, you would not know since Satan is great with lies and deceit.

Anonymous said...

Everybody siemer down. Hahahaha

Anonymous said...

When he was fighting the provision in the original federalization bill that would have given long-term guest workers the right to stay here indefinitely (but not bring their families), Fitial said that the CNMI would not be able to support all of those people in a declining economy. And that original federalization bill would have addressed that problem by allowing the guest workers to seek jobs elsewhere in the U.S. Now, Fitial wants to grant permanent status in the CNMI to guest workers and allow them to bring their families as well. There would be no "safety valve" allowing these guest workers to go elsewhere in the U.S. if there were not enough jobs in the CNMI. So what is Fitial saying now, that he wants to purposely inflict on the CNMI all of the horrible things that he predicted the federalization bill would cause? This is so transparent it isn't funny.

Anonymous said...

I can't wait to read Erediano's article about this in tomorrow's Marianas Variety.

Anonymous said...

ee may like the new bill if they invited him to the dog and pony show

Anonymous said...

i have read both bills and it is very confusing to me. i think it is easier to make a desision by looking at who thinks it is good for us and who thinks it is bad.

i have seen deanne siemer and her husband and some other people for this bill. none of them have ever spoke to me.

i have also seen ed propste, ron hodges, and know wendy doromal very well. ed and ron have both opened and held the door for me and wendy contacts me to ask about my family. so who do i think cares about me? i think the second group.

if the new bill from the US has problems i know who would try to iron them out for the poor people

Anonymous said...

i asked ronnie why he never responded to a greg cruz atack and he just laughed

at a meeting at the consulate ronnie wispered to me that greg was not the bad guy, but we have two of them sitting up front. the two were howard willens and deanne siemer. he had them figured early.

Anonymous said...

Did Ron Hodges attend this residency meeting?

Anonymous said...

which side did steve woodruff represent, the cnmi government or dekada

better times said...

Do u think woodruff wud change sides in the middle of the game? He is not a traitor. Siemer and Willens were brought in by Uncle Ben to fight federalization, plain and simple. I don't trust these two further than I can throw them. Yes, the Fitial admin contradicts themselves all the time. Let us not forget Uncle Ben is scared Jacky Abramoff might rat him out so that is why he speaks so kindly of the convicted felon. Certainly Uncle Ben doesn't want to go to pen fed. Can we all sing the theme song to Uncle Ben's theme song? They will bring better times! Yes, better times for the corrupted few!

Anonymous said...

From now on can we change the name Fitial admin to God Incorporated? He thinks he is God so why not call him our Holy Father?

Anonymous said...

Okay, but only if we call Deanne Mother Theresa and Howie Pope John Paul.

Anonymous said...

Can someone please tell me why Deanne is a volunteer but gets all her shit paid for? Hey Deanne and Howie, do you honestly for one split second think that the majority of people believe you came out here on your own free will to help us out? Give us a break! You are not fooling the real taotao tano!

OTG said...

OTG. One term governor. I will betting all the dog burgers on Saipan that Fitial will not win another elections. The Covenant Party is finish and I will enjoy watching these cabinet members lining up in the unemployments lines especialy those with no skill and no educations, like there senior policy advisor. From Bob Schwalbach to Thug Mafia Mafnas who choked a Korean student at NMC and beat up a Filipino, he is a real threats. Sorry but there are laws here for a reasons to protect us from people who threatens others. Vote Democrat next election!

Anonymous said...

OCWs comments about what happened at the meeting are at unheard no more.

Anonymous said...

Mr. Hodges did not attend the meeting.

Anonymous said...

If the NMI gets an injunction to stop the ten year past due federalization, it could only mean they have bought a judge. If the US government can not put these criminals behind bars then they have no power anywhere.

Anonymous said...

The US can not control the war in Iraq and can do nothing in the NMI.

Anonymous said...

Forgettaboutit

Anonymous said...

no story about this in either tribune or variety? interesting times.

Anonymous said...

No story cuz d corrupt admin is keeping it on the down low. Fo shizzle!

Anonymous said...

There is no story to tell as any reasonable person knows federalization will happen soon and the Siemer lady can crawl back under whichever rock she came from.

Anonymous said...

Ed Propste for governor!!!!!

The Saipan Blogger アンジェロ・ビラゴメズ said...

Please Vote Jedi.

Anonymous said...

this still merits a mainstream media coverage.

will fitial seek reelection? or juan babauta will be back?

Anonymous said...

juan babauta is running and i'm sure uncle ben will too. one thing is guarenteed or your money back, uncle ben will loose. he does not have a chance unless in less then two years he discovers gold on mt. topocho. who cares because he is rich and is taken care of for the rest of his life.

Anonymous said...

heinz or diego will win

Anonymous said...

heinz dave 2009 baby! all the way!

Anonymous said...

i vote again for fitial. he is honest and always stand up for our people. fitial promise better times for our people and look, it is better times! we are richer then ever and we have plenty tourist more than guam and more investor then guam and look all our people never leave to the usa because plenty job here!

biba fitial! your the man! thank you for making electricity cheaper like you promise and for makeing better times for all of ur people!

Anonymous said...

Bull shit! I left my HOME in SAIPAN because of this corrupt government administration! I have a college degree and no option in Saipan but to teach! Fuck that! I didn't go to Saipan to become a teacher! I'm a business major! Fitial is the worst governor in the history of Saipan. All qualified and capable college grads are leaving Saipan for better opportunities. I will never forgive this corrupt Governor Fitial. You are a liar and deserve to be bedtime buddies with Jack Abramoff.

Anonymous said...

Tan + Fitial + Garment + Poker + Triads + Money Laundering + Promise of Better Times = Bitter Times.

Uncle Ben, we will not be fooled by your lies ever again. Vote DEMOCRAT 2009! Biba Democrat! It is time to take our island back my brothers and sisters! Don't be fooled anymore by these liars!

Anonymous said...

I only have one thing to say....

FREEEEEEEEEEEEDOM!

- Braveheart

Anonymous said...

I only have one thing to say....

CORRUPTION!

- CNMI Voters

Anonymous said...

someone a few posts up said, "the US can't control the war in Iraq and can't do anything here". the truth is, the US doesn't need to institute a war here. the covenant lays the foundation for the US takeover of various current (and previous) local government functions, and if they wanted to, they could easily find reasons to take over the rest. as a previous enlisted soldier, now reservist, i can say with all honesty, a single platoon can take and hold the entire island of Saipan. let's be thankful we have right now the guidance of a political document in our covenant.

Anonymous said...

That's boo shet! Ray mafia mafnas will lead us to victory. He is a former marine and is trong enough to beat up a poor defenseless korean student at nmc. America has rambo n Saipan has Raybo!

Armchair Lawyer said...

It looks like this meeting was in the nature of an unofficial trial balloon, so there is nothing sinister about not publicizing it. The April 2nd meeting should be interesting.

See
http://unheardnomore.blogspot.com/2008/03/second-meeting-on-guest-worker-status.html.

As for the claims that the tentative proposals violate the Covenant, are unconstitutional, or could be "taken back," the CNMI Constitution could be amended to once again allow CNMI permanent residence, as existed through 1981 in full compliance with the Covenant.

And, no, the courts would not allow retroactive removal of validly granted permanent residence, because that would violate their due process. There is a case on that in the District Court for the NMI, which is why, even to this day, we still have a few folks issued CNMI permanent resident cards before 1981 that are still valid. (They didn't have any children born in the CNMI after 1978 who could petition them.) Of course, CNMI permanent residence grants no rights to go to Guam or the U.S.

It is interesting that shorter periods of long-term residence are also contemplated, rather than lifetime "permanent" residence. Obviously, this is not such a good deal, but if Foreign National Workers had the right to stay in the CNMI for a set period of time not contingent on ties to a particular employer, that would reduce opportunities for abuse.

It is actually funny that some folks are so paranoid that they resist bona fide efforts to improve things.

That's one problem with judging ideas on the personalities involved rather than the merits of the idea. Hence, my predeliction for anononymity.

Anonymous said...

TaoTaoTano.com is for sale. If anyone is interested, please leave your email address down, and I will contact you. And no, I will not trade it for a case of spam or bud.

Anonymous said...

armchair lawyer - you used due process and cnmi in the same sentence...my, aren't uou a trusting soul

Anonymous said...

R these mainland lawyers planning to sue or get an injunction to block the feds? Will they spend NMI money? Who will make money on it? Does the 27 Congresspersons we pay millions of unaccountable money have a say in it or is Ben and his mainland lawyers make the decisions for the people here?

The 16th group of lawmakers looks wimpier than the 15th in light of the fact 2 freakin hoale women lawyers don't even ask to make offer for the NMI. That is some BS and our House of Reps and Senate has their head sruck where the sun don't shine...lost...and terribly weak.

Anonymous said...

Siemer and Kara are getting paid or why else would 2 writers of PL-15-108 give a shit. Lawyers don't do shit other the sell to the highest bidder. Who exactly do they speak for? I ask a House member and that doesn't even know about this...what a joke.

R dadakada paying Woodruff or is he a free shyster 2?

Anonymous said...

Governor?

Greg Cruz & Stanley Torres (lost Republican Party)

-vs-

Ben Fitial & Marian Pierce (Comeback Covenant Party)

-vs-

Sen. Pangelinan & Tina Sablan (New Democratic Party)

Anonymous said...

What happened to transparency? Why not publicize all meetings armchair lawyer? The person who outlined the steps is right. They are using the guest workers. It's clear.

Anonymous said...

this is all a scam. the government is run by scammers in cahoots with corrupt businesses making a living off of the backs of slave-wage workers.

they are so threatened by the federal takeover that they now throw out the permanent residence bone to try to get non-resident workers to "switch sides".

its a ploy, a joke, a ruse.

don't forget. every time the feds talked about minimum wage, the local government ran to discuss a "wage board" or some other bs. nothing ever came of it, and likewise, nothing will come of this.

it would be nice to think that those in power would be intelligent enough and humane enough to pursue this. they're not. don't let them fool you.

Anonymous said...

When will our local Congress make some statement and take some position on something for all they are paid. Who the hell is Deanne Siemer anyway. I have never seen this lady and did not vote for her. Our local government is looking like complete Jackasses to Washington DC for sitting around with their thunb stuck up their arse.

HBM said...

Dang, Weird Elle, 60 comments and counting. You're definitely going to be in the running for "Saipan Middle Road Employee of the Month." Enjoy the parking space!

Anonymous said...

Give Diane Seimoron the parking space. Her old ass need it more!

Weird Elle said...

HBM, we don't have a parking lot!

Anonymous said...

This is a disgraceful situation. Amen to whoever said when will our government do SOMETHING. Are they still against federalization? Shouldn't it be part time residency since we must repatriate 6 months of every three years? There is no provision or budget for our AMERICAN CITIZEN CHILDREN. This Conress is so clueless we have an old hoale lawyer calling the shots for a lost administration.

Anonymous said...

When will the US Congress protect US citizen cheldren here from these people and this heartless administration?

Anonymous said...

Do you workers think we like taking orders from that b&tch in immigration? WE DO NOT and want the feds worse than you.

HBM said...

No parking lot? Then where is the dedicated army of Saipan Middle Road employees supposed to park when they arrive at SMR's worldwide corporate headquarters each morning?

Anonymous said...

On Middle Road?

Anonymous said...

Get rid of all guest workers now.

Anonymous said...

Get rid of them and who will dill their jobs? The economy would crash, life as you know it -gone...

HBM said...

70 comments and counting, Weird Elle. We're going to have to build you a parking lot just so we can give you the "Saipan Middle Road Employee of the Month" space.

Anonymous said...

Still no story in 2 newspapers about fitial's permanent residency plan? strange days indeed!

Anonymous said...

No story because it is a bullshit pipedream identified by Irene, Wendy, Ron, and others before it ever got fully hatched.

Anonymous said...

Deanne Siemer and Mother Theresa mentioned above in the same sentence, what a joke.

Anonymous said...

Mam Wendy will stop her...YES to federalization and NO to cams from the Ben Fitial & American lawyer gang.

Anonymous said...

I heard that some arguments have broken out in the guest worker community about whether to attend these meetings. Keep your eyes on the prize, people, and stay united!

Armchair Lawyer said...

This reminds me of the Marijuana Decriminalization fiasco.

People are so quick to shoot down trial baloons, create controversy, and position themselves that they take aim while the ballon is still in someone's mouth.

Pop!

I hope this sort of crab mentality doesn't overtake the Northern Islands National Monument.

Let's give ideas respectful consideration -- after they have been formulated -- before we pile on.

Anonymous said...

Do you know what they call 50 lawyers chained to the bottom of the Tinain channel?

A good start

bradinthesand said...

"This reminds me of the Marijuana Decriminalization fiasco.

People are so quick to shoot down trial baloons, create controversy, and position themselves that they take aim while the ballon is still in someone's mouth."

well i'm glad the marijuana crap fizzled out. pot is for dirty hippies addicted to reggae and allergic to showers...

*sorry to my friends who smoke. i still like you but i think pot is nasty...

dekada lawyer said...

Get a grip, Weird Elle. There are far too many points for what little time I have, but here are a salient few.

One, there was nothing secret about the meeting. A meeting is not secret just because the media are not invited. If this meeting was "secret" then 99.9% of all meetings on the island are "secret." Truth is, the term "secret" got applied to this process only as a rhetorical device used by some to disparage the process because they were not participants and were not given a veto over what would be done or allowed to dictate what is in the best interest of workers and long-term alien residents of the CNMI.

Two, the people involved on the side of workers and long-term alien residents of the CNMI are all responsible individuals, chosen by the workers and long-term alien residents themselves to perform leadership roles. We are intimately familiar with the myriad details of exactly what aliens and workers in the CNMI face in the labor and immigration arena.

Three, we also know what the current "federalization" legislation will and will not do to meet the needs of workers and long-term alien residents. We harbor no illusions; neither are we deceived by specious legal analyses, threats of litigation, and other propaganda. We carefully evaluate the legal and political landscape.

Four, this process is not about the Fitial administration "granting" something to workers and long-term alien residents. It is not a government initiative. Legislators have specifically been excluded to date (that is, from the first two meetings), although that restriction no longer applies. Legislators were excluded in the initial stages to avoid the possibility of negative reactions before the concept had really formed any substance. There is so far no evidence whatsoever of the Governor endorsing any enhanced status. Indeed, I know that legislators who believe there should be action in this area are concerned about having a bill the Governor would be willing to sign.

Five, the proper nomenclature has not been settled. Calling it "permanent residency" is confusing. That term is a lightening rod for uninformed negative reactions both in the CNMI and Washington, DC. We are very well aware of what the legal considerations are for any such proposal, and the processes available to address those considerations.

Six, the process is actually nothing more than an attempt to answer the question of what a meaningful reform addressing the legitimate concerns and interests of long-term alien residents and actually capable of becoming CNMI law would look like. Answering this question requires that all stakeholders have a place at the table.

Seven, Deanne Siemer requested a meeting with some of the Filipino leadership out of the Unity Movement core group. As the largest ethnic group of foreign national workers in the CNMI, Ms. Siemer believed this to be the best starting point for an attempt to build a consensus on how to address the status question locally.

Eight, local action and federalization are not mutually exclusive. This is especially true right now for two reasons: a) there is much the legislation presently before the U.S. Senate does not address, and b) even after the President signs the "federalization" bill, it will be a year to 18 months before the bulk of the law kicks in.

Nine, the interests of workers, long-term alien residents, businesses, locals, and the government also are not mutually exclusive. We all have some interests in common and some that are different. Consequently, it is possible through discussion to reach agreement on an approach to an issue that leaves us all better off than we would be otherwise.

Ten, there are many reasons for business, locals, and the government to want to reach common ground with workers and long-term alien residents of the CNMI. In short, doing so is in the best interest of the community -- the entire community we all share. That, supposedly, is what the Unity Movement is all about.

Eleven, in larger terms, workers and long-term alien residents have the stronger position at present. Their concerns have the attention of the U.S. Congress. Here in the CNMI, the Unity Movement has displayed a solidarity that did not previously exist. Federalization looms. Many businesses and politicians have shortsightedly fought against it. I have repeatedly said that we need to "cross the federalization hurdle" so we can all work together to make federalization work for the benefit of everyone in the CNMI. The present balance of power and political dynamic creates a unique opportunity. This process, which has just begun, has the potential to lead to the steps that make federalization work for the CNMI.

Twelve, "the other side," and specifically Deanne Siemer and Maya Kara, may still vigorously oppose federalization -- but as a practical matter, assuming they represent certain business and political interests and their own, they must prepare for that eventuality even if they insist it will never occur. Predictably, their course (based on the foregoing assumption) would pursue the outcome they believe best in the context of either eventuality.

Thirteen, the small group of Filipino leaders, drawn largely from the Dekada Movement, which has been at the forefront of the quest for improved status for long-term alien residents, agreed to meet with Deanne Siemer only with the presence of legal counsel and only a venue of their choosing (my conference room). When that first meeting took place, Ms. Siemer brought Ms. Kara along with her. Naturally, there was no reason to object because we are well aware of Ms. Kara's extensive connections with the Saipan Chamber of Commerce, the CNMI Bar Association, and many leading politicians and (principally past) public officials.

Fourteen, at that first meeting, we first listened to hear what Ms. Siemer and Ms. Kara had to say. We then locked in our concerns and challenged points on which we disagreed. The most important thing that happened at that meeting was the laying down of some ground rules for opening this dialogue, this conversation about status. Distinctly, there is much in common with the ground rules Tina Sablan laid down for her Commonwealth forums, e.g. no personal attacks, everyone gets to have a say, no media grandstanding. The most important rules were that the discussion is not about federalization, PL 15-108, or minimum wage. Our respective views on those topics are to be put off to the side and the discussion focused on the question of status under prospective local law. it was explicitly agreed that all sides are free to advocate their respective positions on these issues independent of this process and without affecting the process.

Fifteen, consequently, it should be very clear that we are pro-federalization and strongly advocating for federal action to fully address the status question and provide U.S. lawful permanent residence and a pathway to citizenship in appropriate cases -- consistent with the mandate in the present federalization bill. The present initiative is for the purpose of addressing current needs for reforms in CNMI law. Those needs exist and are morally and socially compelling regardless of federalization. Furthermore, the steps we take here have the potential to frame the implementation of federalization in a way that benefits all.

Sixteen, there is nothing new about this. The Dekada Movement was formed four years ago to seek improved status for long-term alien residents of the CNMI, not just by way of "green cards" under Federal auspices, but also through improved status under CNMI law. Moreover, CNMI political leaders as far back as 1994 or 1996 were openly considering the possibility of granting "permanent residency" to some class of alien workers (despite the existence of a peculiar constitutional provision that is part of the existing legal firmament that must be considered).

Seventeen, this process and the work Rep. Tina Sablan is doing are not either-or propositions. Each informs the other. In fact, many of us involved in this process had another "secret" meeting with Tina yesterday evening. Deanne Siemer also talks with Tina outside of these other meetings. I suppose those too are "secret" meetings.

dekada lawyer said...

The Chamber president was not there, the Chamber Executive Director was.

dekada lawyer said...

My, my. Anons five-step "plan" sure presumes "guest workers" and their leaders are stupid!

dekada lawyer said...

Devil, wasn't it you who said in a secret meeting that if you google "Deanne Siemer" the first five pages are material posted by people who think she is the Anit-Christ?

Readers, try it for yourself for your own personal revelation on deceit ....

Anonymous said...

mr. woodruff, who are you working for and who is paying you? Who is paying siemer and who does she represent? please don't tell us free as she flys arounf more than fitial and babuata. Who does ms. kara work for, represent, and get paid by?

Anonymous said...

how much does the government owe you steve...if you represent dekata for free that could explain the longevity of their plight

Anonymous said...

anyone wanting to help guest workers would not incite so much division and would chill out

everyone should take a deep breath and be nicer

Anonymous said...

As the anonymous author of said five-step plan, I certainly do not think the guest workers are stupid. My comment is about the motivation of Ms. Siemer, who would not do anything without the Governor's consent. Just because they will try to get the guest workers to lobby against federalization (and they will try) does not mean that the guest workers will do so. My comment therefore is not a reflection on the guest workers. Although I remain skeptical that anything will come of this process, I think it's certainly worth exploring as long as the good guys walk in with their eyes wide open.

Anonymous said...

What's Maya Kara's role in this? I know she served in the AG's office during the "dark days", but I thought she was in favor of federalization. True? Not that it necessarily matters for the purpose of this process. But why is she involved?

HBM said...

Weird Elle did not say that it was a "secret" meeting. She said that the meeting was not supposed to be a secret meeting. Isn't that right, Weird? In any event, she posed a lot of good questions that are on a lot of people's minds.

HBM said...

I think that there will be a real opportunity for the community to come together once the federalization bill passes. It will be easier to find common ground once the question shifts from "whether" to "how".

HBM said...

On the other hand, those who are intent on keeping the guest workers' options limited (resulting in guest workers who are easier to exploit) will be able to lobby to do so within the context of a federalized immigration system. The guest workers can hopefully overcome that, however, by offering to lend their credibility (which is higher in DC than that of the anti-federalization crowd) to a unified CNMI position that supports liberal access for tourists, workers, students, investors and wealthy retirees, and the right to apply for U.S. permanent residence for long-term guest workers (subject to safeguards). Maybe that's a pipe dream, but it becomes more possible once federalization passes.

HBM said...

And anyone who accuses me of splitting up my comments in order to help push this to the century mark is a vicious, scandalous liar (who nonetheless may be correct).

Anonymous said...

Where is the next meeting and can everybody come?

Anonymous said...

Is the next meeting still on April 2?

Anonymous said...

did you hear that scientists have stopped doing experiments on rats, and are doing them on lawyers instead? lawyers are better than rats for experiments because (a) there are more lawyers than rats (b) the lab workers don't become attached to the lawyers and (c) there are certain things that rats won't do.

Anonymous said...

why don't sharks eat lawyers? professional courtesy.

Anonymous said...

what is hte difference between a catfish and a lawyer? one is a bottom dwelling, scum eating creature, and one is a fish.

Anonymous said...

Kara says we "must oppose Federalization."

Anonymous said...

Who is Kara anyway, I have lived here 5 years and have never met her?

dekada lawyer said...

The next meeting is scheduled for April 2. It was to be at 6:30 p.m. at the American Memorial Park Visitor Center Theater, but that venue is not available on that date. We are looking for another indoor venue with an even larger seating capacity.

Anyone can come, subject to room capacity. Some people are specifically being invited (I'm not sure who those would be, but there are some in that category), but lack of an invitation does not mean someone would be denied access.

My office has been receiving phone calls from many, many workers who want to attend. Our preference is that they all be able to.

Anonymous said...

This blog has become screwy and I don't understand many of these comments or they are off the original topic.

dekada lawyer said...

hbm, you may rest assured this post will surpass the centennial comment mark even without your splitting of comments.

Anonymous said...

Why would a worker attend a meeting with an administration that is deceitful, has done everything to block federalization, has no integrity, lobbyied to have grandfathering removed or delayed, and certainly wants & needs guest worker support to have any straw to block the feds?

Anonymous said...

The Human Dignity Movement will hold a prayer rally April 5, 2008.

Anonymous said...

I think the feds will grant amnesty to guest workers that have immigration paperwork problems.

Anonymous said...

Who attended the original "secret" meeting? One can figure that the Fitial hand picked patsies to push around or those that could be easily bought.

Anonymous said...

Will Martin N. play at either the prayer rally April 5 or the anti-Unity April 2 group.

Anonymous said...

Will the Fitial provide food like for the TTT anti-fed rally?

dekada lawyer said...

hbm, you are correct that Weird Elle did not say it was a secret meeting, but she did suggest a sort of congruence between "secret meetings" and failure to invite the media.

I admit that I did not at first read the post closely enough, such that when I first wrote my comments about secrecy I was under the misapprehension that she had called it a secret meeting. However, I was already disabused of that error by rereading prior to actual publication of my comment.

I elected to post as originally written for two reasons. The first is as stated above. The second is the fact that one or more individuals have indeed used the false charge of secrecy polemically to denigrate and disparage a responsible process undertaken conscientiously by individuals chosen by workers and long-term alien residents themselves to exercise leadership in furtherance of their interests.

If Weird Elle feels in any way slighted by my remarks, I apologize.

Weird Elle said...

:)

Anonymous said...

Oh, really? Who "chose" Siemer and Kara to speak for them? Which workers or groups went to them to ask for a dialogue on permanent residency? Did the workers go to them because of all the good things they did for them when they got the grandfather clause removed from the Federal bill, or because of the good things they did for them when they put out the new law that will separate them from their families for six months every three years, or because they represent a governor who said, "They are all illegal and we intend to deport them."? Which Administration officials do they speak on behalf of? Who is paying the bill to have them involved? Puh-leeze, don't try to sell this "volunteer" B.S., because they are going to get paid one way or the other.

dekada lawyer said...

Anon asks, "Oh, really?" but to what I can not even guess. Anon's next question, "Who 'chose' Siemer and Kara to speak for them?" is more susceptible of an answer.

Accordingly to Siemer and Kara, they are acting as private citizens, according to their own initiative. They do not claim to "speak for" anyone other than themselves. Siemer, supported by Kara, proposed a process aimed at building a consensus for enactment of a special status for long-term alien residents more in keeping with their contributions to the CNMI and place in the community.

Are they telling the truth when they say they are not acting on behalf of someone else in this initiative? We have no way of knowing for sure. Does it matter? No. One thing for sure, they certainly do not gain greater status or credibility by emphasizing that they do not speak for any of the individuals or institutions that exercise political power, and that they have no authority to negotiate or bind anyone.

What they have done so far is deliver on what they said they would do (which is better than most politicians). There have only been two meetings, so they have only been put to the test once, but they brought the Chamber of Commerce and TaoTao Tano's Greg Cruz to the table as they said they would.

After the second question, Anon's "inquiries" go downhill rapidly. In asking, "Which workers or groups went to [Siemer and Kara] to ask for a dialogue on permanent residency?" and "Did the workers go to them ....", Anon demonstrates that he or she does not know how to read. No workers went to Siemer and Kara. I addressed the matter clearly in points thirteen and fourteen of this post. The following excerpts will highlight the point:

Thirteen, the small group of Filipino leaders, drawn largely from the Dekada Movement ... agreed to meet with Deanne Siemer only with the presence of legal counsel and only at a venue of their choosing (my conference room).

Fourteen, at that first meeting, we first listened to hear what Ms. Siemer and Ms. Kara had to say. We then locked in our concerns and challenged points on which we disagreed.

Clearly, this is not a matter of workers and long-term alien residents going to the likes of Siemer and Kara seeking some kind of queenly dispensation. The notion is beyond ludicrous. The Dekada Movement, joined more recently by the Human Dignity Movement and others, followed by the massive coming together of broad segments of the diverse elements of our island community into the Unity Movement, have campaigned for years for improved status for long-term alien residents of the CNMI. Congressional action is imminent that address part of what the movement has sought.

The present developments involving Siemer and Kara have all the appearances of being a response to the long campaign. The inexorable flow of events at present, clearly in favor of workers and long-term alien residents, should make it clear to all but the most stubborn and dim-witted of the CNMI's existing political and economic elites that their interests are best served by finding some common ground with workers and long-term alien residents. Though no inflated dignity or importance for their role should flow from the observation, Siemer and Kara, in diplomatic terms, might be considered unofficial envoys. Fundamentally, there can be no good reason for refusing to engage in the process, for refusing to hear what others have to say.

Of course, Anon actually did not mean the questions as questions. Rather, they were merely clumsy rhetorical devices. The real thrust of Anon's post is to disparage the process, to discourage participation -- but the argument is merely sophistry, coupled with mendacity, as clearly appears upon close examination.

Anonymous said...

Do you have the exact time, date and place where the next meeting will be at?

Anonymous said...

Dekada lawyer -I don't trust you

Anonymous said...

Dekada lawyer picked who would represent the guest workers at the first meeting. What's in this for Dekada Lawyer?

Anonymous said...

someone snitched that "anonymous" is variety's editor

dekada lawyer said...

I did NOT pick the participants for the first meeting. Neither did the participants at the first meeting purport to "represent the guest workers."

It was an exploratory meeting that we agreed to after Deanne Siemer approached Conrad Ocampo at Coffee Care and asked specifically to meet with "some of the Filipino leadership from the Unity Movement core group."

Conrad informed Boni Sagana and Malou Barueco of the request, and those three then consulted with me about whether it was advisable to accept or reject Ms. Siemer's request. My advice was that it made sense to find out what Ms. Siemer wanted to say, PROVIDED she agreed that they could have counsel present and that the venue was a place of their chosing. I offered my conference room as the venue most clearly the worker's turf, as opposed to Ms. Siemer's. Ms. Siemer immediately agreed to both conditions, and the meeting was scheduled.

There was then some discussion with me regarding who should be included in what of necessity was to be a small meeting. One consideration was Ms. Siemer's single request: that there be be no media grandstanding. The final decision of who would attend was made by the workers to whom the request was directed.

When Ms. Siemer arrived, she brought along Maya Kara.

Here are the attendees at the first meeting: Deanne Siemer, Maya Kara, Bonnie Sagana, Malou Barueco, Hector Sevilla, Lito Parulan, Conrad Ocampo, Edong, and myself.

As noted, it was an exploratory meeting. The only things agreed were the basic ground rules (like Tina Sablan's forums) and that there would be second meeting Saturday, March 22, 2008, at 12 noon, at China House restaurant.

This innocuous exploratory meeting then managed to engender the most phenomenal uninformed knee-jerk emotional negative reactions from a querulous few when the leaders present did precisely what it was their responsibility to do: pass on the information to the larger community of workers and long-term alien residents.

dekada lawyer said...

Anon asks, "What's in this for Dekada Lawyer?"

Simple, if we achieve improved status under local law for long-term alien residents of the CNMI, I will have been a part of doing something truly meaningful for those foreign national workers that presently labor under an unjust an unfair labor and immigration regime that limits their ability to act as free actors in a free economy, bound only by the limits of their individual initiative and personal responsibility. I will have acted as a liberator, and helped break the shackles of an economically destructive system that is plaguing the CNMI today.

I will also have served my clients well -- the Dekada Movement and the literally hundreds of aliens I have represented in labor and immigration matters. I will have acted honorably in accordance with my principles and my professional responsibilities.

And in my book, those things, and the dignity of every alien worker in the CNMI -- indeed every worker, local and foreign -- are far more important than money.

dekada lawyer said...

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT

The following members of the Unity Movement organizers core group, Malou Barueco; Bonnie Sagana of the Dekada Movement; Conrad Ocampo; and Ernest Maicle of MOVER wish to inform the public that there will be a forum on “Long-Term Resident Status: Issues and Possibilities for Change Under CNMI Law” at the Monte Carlo (across from Hopwood Jr. High School) at 6:30 pm, Wednesday, April 2, 2008.

All interested foreign national workers, local workers and business people, representatives of the business community, local citizen action group members, and members of the general public, of all races and nationalities, are welcome to attend and participate in the discussion.

Anticipated speakers are Dekada Movement counsel Stephen C. Woodruff; well-known attorney Deanne Siemer (best known to workers and long-term alien residents of the CNMI, often controversially, as someone actively involved in labor and immigration matters, PL 15-108, and the new labor regulations); Maya Kara (president of the CNMI Bar Association, former acting Attorney General, former governor’s legal counsel, former lieutenant governor’s legal counsel, and former House Legal Counsel); and Greg Cruz, president of TaoTao Tano.

Both Ms. Siemer and Ms. Kara emphasize that they are involved and will speak only for themselves, in their personal capacities, and not as representatives of the government, clients, or any special interest group.

Other speakers may be added, and there will be extensive opportunity for questions, answers, and general discussion.

This forum is NOT about “federalization.” It is NOT about minimum wage. It is NOT about PL 15-108. It is specifically recognized that all parties have their own views and positions on these topics, and agreed that all are free to advocate their positions outside the forum, but that, within the context of the forum, these issues will be put to the side and the focus will be exclusively on the question of long-term alien resident status.

A minimum donation of two dollars ($2.00) per person will be required at the door to cover the costs of use of the Monte Carlo facilities. The two dollar donation also entitles each person to one beverage from the house. Additional beverages may be purchased at usual Monte Carlo prices.

This is the third meeting on the Long-Term Resident status public discussion initiative. The first preliminary, exploratory meeting, involving only a very small group, was held on Tuesday, March 11, 2008, in the conference room of Atty. Steve Woodruff. The second meeting of 30 to 40 persons was Saturday, March 22, 2008, at the China House restaurant.

Anonymous said...

No one would argue that the United States is a nation of immigrants. Yet, today guest worker programs and the immigration debate has created controversy, fueled hatred, and spun debate in all corners of our country, and across the ocean to our territories. The issue of legal foreign guest workers has become blurred with the issue of illegal immigrants. The defeat of the Dream Act, the defeat of S.1348, Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2007, and even the removal of the grandfathering provision from CNMI federalization legislation demonstrates the effectiveness of nativists, supremacists, hate radio hosts, politicians, and lobbyists in campaigning against status for immigrants and their children.

However, there is evidence that the tide is changing. Immigration rights groups, human rights advocates, religious leaders, and individuals of conscience are pushing back and making inroads. Recent Republican exit polls in the Florida primary showed that only 16% of voters polled considered immigration as the most important issue facing this country. (The question wasn't on the Democrat exit poll.)

The Statue of Liberty stands in New York City Harbor with her back to the shores of the United States. She faces the sea with her torch raised to the world as if to beckon and welcome those coming to our nation seeking freedom, liberty, and the American dream. The statue was dedicated on October 28, 1886. This was a time when the United States accepted immigrants with open arms. Between 1881 and 1920 about 23.5 million immigrants settled in the United States. My ancestors were among them.

The Statue of Liberty was a gift from the people of France who raised money primarily through voluntary donations to show their friendship to the people of the United States; to express their appreciation to a country that respected and upheld individual liberty. After the statue’s arrival in the U.S., the American people raised money through voluntary donations to build the pedestal upon which it would stand on Bedloe’s Island in New York City Harbor. Among the fund raisers was an art auction. American writers including Mark Twain, Walt Whitman, and others sent original work to be auctioned to raise funds for the pedestal. But it was Emma Lazurus, a poet and an advocate for disenfranchised immigrants, who wrote the sonnet that sold for $1,500 and would later be inscribed on a plaque at the base of the statue after her death. Her poem is a tribute to our country’s willingness to share our wealth and opportunities with those seeking a better life:

The New Colossus
Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
"Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!" cries she
With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!"

As the poem suggests, the U.S. was once a country that openly welcomed immigrants and foreign laborers knowing that they strengthened our nation through their labor, skills, and talents. It was a country that appreciated their contributions in creating the diverse fabric that makes the American culture.

One hundred twenty years later, some Americans fear that guest workers and immigrants are taking their jobs, straining infrastructures, taxing health care programs, and contributing to criminal activity in their communities. Wasn't that the premise of Resolution 80 that opposed the provision to grant FAS-type status to the long-term guest workers of the CNMI? The Catholic Bishops of Mexico and the United States are dispelling these myths through Justice for Immigrants, an educational advocacy campaign for immigration reform. This page gets the facts out with supportive documentation and data.

The fears that immigrants and guest workers negatively impact our society have been promoted extensively and relentlessly through the American media. CNN's Lou Dobbs, hosts a nightly anti-immigrant show that is biased and mean-spirited. Think Progress quoted Speaker Nancy Pelosi claiming that conservative hate radio programs, which make up 91% of the talk radio show airwaves, "hijacked the Senate immigration bill with xenophobic, anti-immigrant rhetoric."

Here are some statements that Think Progress attributed to the anti-immigrant, anti-guest worker radio hosts:

Michael Savage -"The the National Council of La Raza (NCLR) "the Ku Klux Klan of the Hispanic people."

Bill O'Rielly - "There is a segment of the population who, like The New York Times, wants to see some restrictions on migration in the Senate immigration bill eased or modified hate America, and they hate it because it's run primarily by white, Christian men. Let me repeat that. America is run primarily by white, Christian men, and there is a segment of our population who hates that, despises that power structure."

Neal Boortz - "On the June 18 broadcast of his nationally syndicated radio show, Neal Boortz advocated building a "double fence along the Mexican border, and stop the damn invasion." Boortz continued: "I don't care if Mexicans pile up against that fence like tumbleweeds in the Santa Ana winds in Southern California. Let 'em. You know, then just run a couple of taco trucks up and down the line, and somebody's gonna be a millionaire out of that."

Let's not forget hate radio's kings, Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity. The CNMI has it own anti-guest federal immigration radio and television hosts with Harry Blalock and John Gonzalez. Yet, it appears that all of these commentators just have the microphone that gives them the ability to speak loudly and reach millions. Their message does not reflect the thinking of the majority of the American population. As The New York Times indicated, these commentators do not speak for most Americans who support comprehensive immigration reform:

"More than half of those who favor the guest worker program say the workers should be allowed to apply to become permanent immigrants and eventually American citizens if they maintain a strong work history and commit no crimes. About a third of those who favored the program disagree, saying guest workers should be required to return home after their temporary period."

The immigration debate in America has helped to put a face on the guest workers and immigrants. For decades many Americans did not even think about the people who harvested their crops, constructed their buildings, and served in hundreds of essential jobs that they, themselves, would not want to perform. Now they do, and increasingly they support giving green cards to long-term guest workers.

I have always believed that green card status is the only status that the United States government should offer any long-term guest worker. This is the status that I have requested in conversations and letters to federal officials, members of the House Natural Resources Committee, and members of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources to support for the long-term guest workers of the CNMI. Anyone who has come to work on U.S. soil, who has provided his or his labor to advance our society and contribute to the social and economic good of our communities, deserves a pathway to citizenship. It is the only status that is morally, socially, economically, and politically correct. Anything less promotes disenfranchisement and indentured servitude, which does not support the democratic values upon which our nation was founded. Anything less is unAmerican.

In the case of the CNMI the U.S. government, the CNMI government, and representatives of the business community acknowledge that the CNMI needs approximately 18,000 foreign guest workers to provide an adequate workforce. We know that S. 2937 calls for a change to phase out of foreign contract workers under the current CNMI labor and immigration system and convert the guest workers to H-1 or H-2 workers under the federal system. There will be a one-year transition period from the time the bill is signed into law until the time it goes into effect with the U.S. immigration system with special provisions to met the needs of the CNMI. Lynn Knight, HANMI director, was quoted in a Saipan Tribune story this month as saying:

“We are short at least 18,000 employees, now filled by foreign workers,” said Knight. “The math is very, very simple. There's simply not enough local people here to fill all of the jobs.”

The solution is for the federal government to grant the long-term foreign contract workers (those who have lived and worked legally in the CNMI for 5 years or longer) green card status. Many of the long-term guest workers are parents of the estimated 5,000 to 7,000 U.S. citizen children who were born in the CNMI. If these legal guest workers were given green cards, the workforce would become stabilized and an adequate number of skilled workers would be ensured. This plan would give security to the workers and their families, and would provide the best possible solution to grow the economy of the CNMI.

While local plans may provide a temporary solution or be helpful in the year-long transition period from the time S. 2739 is passed until the law goes into effect, local plans cannot provide permanent stability. They would not free the guest workers from disenfranchisement. The CNMI government has no legal authority to provide non-resident workers with permanent status. They can only offer extended contracts or limited stays with an ending date, that may be renewed. (And only if proposed legislation or a constitutional amendment passes.) Additionally,what kind of lasting stability could be provided from a government that continually changes laws, decisions, and policies to perpetuate the maximum exploitation of guest workers? Any meaningful permanent status provided to the long-term guest workers will have to come from the federal government.

When first introduced, H.R. 3079 gave hope to the guest workers that they would finally receive some sort of status, albeit inferior to what they deserved after long years of sacrifice, sweat, and tears in building the CNMI. Yet, members of the House Natural Resources Committee, under pressure from lobbyists and island leaders in the CNMI and Guam, sent the bill out of committee with an amendment removing the provision. When I protested the removal of the status, suggesting that it jeopardized the integrity of the bill, I was told that this bill would establish federal immigration and labor law as a first step, and status for long-term guest workers would follow as the second step. We need to be proactive in reaching members of Congress now to ensure that green card status is what is granted after the federalization bill is signed into law.

Wendy Doromal
unheardnomore.blogspot.com

Anonymous said...

Under Dekada shyster leadership these poor people will be misrepresented, as they have for the last generation.

Senate council during the Abramoff era turned human rights activist...only in the NMI.

BaBaBaBaaaa

Armchair Lawyer said...

While I disagree with Dekada Shyster on many things, especially federalization, he is on the right path in encouraging us to exercise our self-government responsibly with respect to our long-term Foreign National Workers.

The Old-Girls Network of Deanne C. Seimer, Maya B. Kara, Pamela S. Brown, and the Ombudsperson also deserves kudos.

"The CNMI government has no legal authority to provide non-resident workers with permanent status. They can only offer extended contracts or limited stays with an ending date, that may be renewed. (And only if proposed legislation or a constitutional amendment passes.) Additionally, what kind of lasting stability could be provided from a government that continually changes laws, decisions, and policies to perpetuate the maximum exploitation of guest workers? Any meaningful permanent status provided to the long-term guest workers will have to come from the federal government."

Wendy, you are right about the constitutional amendment part, but wrong about the CNMI's ability to grant permanent residence.

We did so before (until 1981) and could do so again. Your fear of the CNMI arbitrarily revoking such status is unfounded, as the District Court of the Northern Mariana Islands has held that to be an unconstitional deprivation of a property or liberty interest.

There are still workers here with pre-1981 CNMI permanent residence. This is actually a better solution than federalization, because this way the CNMI would not become a stepping stone to the U.S.

Whether such CNMI permanent residence should best be granted after 5, 10, or 15 years is another issue, especially since this is a gratuitous, unbargained-for gift that the United States is not granting, for instance, to far more deserving folks in Iraq who've lost everything helping the United States.

You weaken your cause by claiming "entitlement" to such benefits, or that they "deserve" it. Others deserve it a lot more.

Also, a CNMI semi-permanent residence for a 5-year term might also be beneficial, if free from restrictions tying workers to a specific worker.

Proactive measures can be taken incrementally as well as abruptly. They are not necessarily opposed to each other.

dekada lawyer said...

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT

UPCOMING COMMUNITY DISCUSSION FORUMS

TOPIC: WHAT ARE YOUR VIEWS ON A POSSIBLE LONGER-TERM RESIDENCE STATUS FOR QUALIFIED FOREIGN WORKERS

WHEN AND WHERE:

Kagman Community Center
Wednesday, April 9, 2008 at 6:00 p.m.
(Kagman, Capitol Hill, Papago, Santa Lourdes)

San Vicente Elementary School Cafeteria
Thursday, April 10, 2008 at 6:00 p.m.
(DanDan, San Vicente, Kannat Tabla, Fina Sisu)

Garapan Elementary School Cafeteria
Wednesday, April 16, 2008 at 6:00 p.m.
(San Roque, Tanapag, As Matuis, Puerto Rico, Garapan)

Koblerville Community Center
Thursday, April 17, 2008 at 6:00 p.m.
(San Antonio, Koblerville, Chalan Piao, Chalan Kanoa, Oleai, Susupe)

YOUR OPINIONS ARE WELCOMED:

How many years of successful work in the Commonwealth do you think should qualify a foreign worker for longer-term residence status?

What do you think of social responsibility requirements such as basic English skills and classes in CNMI history?

What kind of financial responsibility requirements do you think would be fair?

What other factors do you think should be considered?

Katz. said...

Hey there. Im a CNMI Permanent residence since 1986. This was granted to those few who resided before 1978 when we became the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas from the Trust Territory times. I came to Saipan on 1975, schooled at Mt Carmel since 1st grade.

Oh well, I speak Chamorro, eat & cook Chamorro, and everything. Just wondering what am I going to get by November 27 2011. Ekkua para manu hit despues... Lets see how they are going to deal with some few people with the same CNMI P.R. will end up. Dont tell me after almost 4 decades, I have to go back to Japan??... lol!

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About this site

This site is the Saipan Middle Roaders' blog--the wannabes, the frustrated ones, and the repressed ones...

There are several thoughts that have been written on paper, online or on the walls of every NMI building's bathrooms.

This site is for the geeks, for the shameless bitches, and for the restless drunks.

This site is for everyone.

Disclaimer:

Posts on this weblog are entirely the authors' opinions and views only.